Staying Warm and Safe in Winter Weather

Winter is here, and with it often comes mounds of snow or storms that can keep you trapped inside. Or even worse, you may lose power. Winter is sneaking up on us and winter really can be the most wonderful time of the year. But being cold takes all the fun out of it! There are many ways to stay warm, even in the coldest of climates.

Here are some tips to help you prepare ahead of time and keep you safe after, both indoors and out.

Heat

It’s important to have a good heating system in your house; the other half is making sure heat doesn’t escape. Before it gets too cold, take some time to weather strip your windows to keep cold air out (and warm air in). If you don’t have the time for a full weatherproofing, a quick bubble wrap application will do the trick.

  • Close off unneeded rooms and windows, stuff rags or towels under cracks in doors.
  • Ventilate a fireplace or wood stove properly if you use one or room heaters.
  • Dress in loose layers that you can add to or take off as needed.
  • Only use a portable generator outdoors.

Wear an under-layer & frostbite tips

A basic way to stay warmer without having to do very much at all is to wear an under layer. This helps you stay warm without adding a lot of bulk or extra steps.

Try to avoid being outside. If you have to go out, follow these tips from the:

  • Dress as warmly as possible in lightweight layers. Wear a hat, cover your mouth, and use mittens instead of gloves.
  • Get medical help right away if you think you have frostbite.
  • Recognize frostbite symptoms: a loss of feeling or a white or pale looking toes, fingers, ear lobes, or the tip of the nose.
  • If you are shivering uncontrollably, slurring speech, or having memory loss, you could have hypothermia. Get medical help ASAP.
  • Get to a warm area and remove wet clothing. If you can’t do that, use your body heat to warm the frostbitten area.

Snows/Storms

Stay as far away as you can from things like rain, snow, puddles, ice, and wind. As these things getting too close is what makes you feel cold. Move quickly between buildings, use a car when you can and when you must be outside and try to walk under a shelter.

Get together needed supplies ahead of time as much as possible, including:

  • Extra food, including foods that don’t need to be refrigerated.
  • Bottled water.
  • Flashlights and batteries and other battery powered items in case the power fails.
  • An ice melting product for slippery sidewalks.
  • A non-electric can opener.
  • Extra blankets and sleeping bags.

Create heat 

If your clothes themselves can’t keep you warm, let your body create heat. Moving around will burn energy in your body, which gets expressed as heat. Try exercising or at least try not to stand still.

  • Jumping jacks are a good option if you’re inside. However, when you’re outside movement like that can be dangerous because of slippery ground conditions. A better way to get active when you’re outside is to do small lunges, which create less chance for slipping.

Medicines

If your medicine needs to be refrigerated, throw it out if the power has been out for a long period of time. The exception: if you can’t get new medication and you need it, continue to take it.

Consume warm foods and beverages

Delicious winter soups and hot cocoa are part of the fun of the season. Hot tea and coffee, and substantial foods like pizza, meat, and toast will keep your body warm as well.

Shoveling Snow

Find a place to get cozy, wrap yourself in army style wool thick blankets and slowly but surely your trapped body heat will warm you right up!

  • Don’t shovel if you have a history of heart disease or heart attack or stroke, or are not in good physical condition.
  • Don’t drink alcohol before or after.
  • Take frequent breaks.
  • Don’t eat a heavy meal before or after.

Right Choices for Winter Clothing

Cold weather is here and all the ladies are ready to set up their wardrobe with warm clothes. Winter clothing is a necessary part of everyone’s wardrobe and a shopping craze is on as soon as the winter approaches. The right choice in accordance with the weather conditions is an important task to carry out. However, while shopping the feature that concerns us the most is fashion.

Keeping you warm does not mean that you wrap up wool all around you. To be very precise, fashion is not just about wearing what is trendy or in demand but it also mean wearing something that makes you feel comfortable. There is a way to keep your body warm yet maintaining the style. Choosing an appropriate and worth-seeing color according to the season is also a priority choice while shopping winter clothing. For some people it is quite hard however if they follow some important tips they will achieve a trendy look yet maintain the body temperature.

Some of the following tips are ideal for you. If you adhere to these tips you will be successful in keeping your body warm without damaging your stylish look.

Favor natural materials

There is nothing warmer and lighter as compared to natural based clothing. Like an overcoat made up of natural materials will keep you warm. A warmer overcoat or oilskin coat should be on hand as this protects all of the inner layers and keeps the wearer dry and completely protected from the elements and an Oilskin coat breathes. There are number of leading brands that are damn good in looks and are best for winters because they help maintaining your body temperature.

Don’t Prefer synthetic Materials to a Great Extent

Man-made materials usually are said to be highly suggested. Many synthetic fabrics offer warmth when they are dry – particularly if they encase a layer of synthetic wadding/filling. Prior to you choose to buy synthetic materials make sure they will help you keep yourself warm. But you should consider that these materials are not always suitable for the unpredictable outdoor conditions. Many of the inorganic materials fail to provide you much needed warmth. By ensuring that you have a woollen layer close to your body, you will stay snugly warm and wool repels moisture so that even when damp, wool does not feel cold. When you check out their cost they are way up high but do not work to keep your body warm. Wool will keep you warm even when it is wet. No synthetic material that will do this.

Keeping Your Head and Feet Warm

Many people think that their head do not feel cold so there is no need to keep it warm during cold days. Keeping your head warm will make your body remain warm. This can be very deceptive and your head never feels cold. The reason behind is that your body transmits more heat to your head as compared to any other part of your body to protect it. Keeping your brain warm is vital that your body will give up any other body part before it will let the brain get cold. Mostly women prefer woolen shawls and head scarf to keep their head warm. Teenagers also like polo caps or stylish woolen caps in order to keep their head warm.

In cold days, always wear well insulated boots and wear woolen socks to keep your feet remain warm. When your feet are warm you will feel less cold during winters. So make proper arrangements in keeping your head and feet warm.

Keep Your Neck Warm

A scarf around your neck or a jacket that zips up to your neck will do the job for you. There are two significant reasons for covering your neck. A less noticeable reason is that you want to seal the top of your jacket so that air does not leak out of the body of your jacket. You actually lose a lot of heat when the top of your jacket remains open hole surrounding your neck. Make sure to buy a jacket that has seals on the cuffs of the sleeves so that you get a tight seal against the cold around your wrists too.

Essential winter care tips that everyone should follow for safety

Winter is a great season for outdoor activities, such as sledding and skating. Cold weather, ice and snow can be both fun and dangerous for children. Winter fun is beckoning, but keeping kids healthy, warm and entertained can be trickier than putting snow boots on a squirrel.

During the winter months, ice, snow and cold temperatures can make life challenging for everyone. Whether winter brings severe storms, light dusting or just cold temperatures, here we have some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm. Slippery sidewalks and cold weather can cause a wide range of injuries and illnesses – especially for seniors.

What to wear

Dress warmly in layers of windproof clothing to prevent frostbite and hypothermia. Remember mittens or gloves, a scarf and a hat that covers your ears. Don’t forget to treat your feet, warm socks and waterproof boots will keep your feet dry.

  • Dress your child warmly for outdoor activities. Don’t forget to wear warm boots, gloves or mittens, and a hat. Use thin layers to keep them dry and warm.
  • The rule of thumb for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing than an adult would wear in the same conditions.
  • The loose bedding should be kept out of an infant’s sleeping environment like blankets, quilts, pillows, bumpers and sheepskins because they are associated with suffocation deaths and may contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Sleep clothing like one-piece sleepers or wearable blankets is preferred.
  • Keep ears covered at all times to prevent frostbite. Use a neck warmer instead of a scarf and mitten clips instead of a string to prevent choking. Wear mittens instead of gloves so that are roomy enough for an extra pair of socks and to wiggle toes around.
  • If a blanket must be used to keep a sleeping infant warm, it should be tucked in around the crib mattress, reaching only as far as the baby’s chest, so the infant’s face is less likely to become covered by bedding materials.

 Hypothermia

Cold temperatures can lead to frostbite and hypothermia – a condition where the body temperature dips too low.

  • Hypothermia develops when a child’s temperature falls below normal, i.e., 95 degrees due to exposure to colder temperatures.
  • As hypothermia sets in, the child may shiver and become lethargic and clumsy.  Speech may become slurred and body temperature will decline in more severe cases.
  • It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without wearing proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.
  • If you suspect your child is hypothermic, immediately move him to the hospital. Until help arrives, take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing, and wrap him in blankets or warm clothes.

Frostbite

Frostbite is another cold weather concern and is especially dangerous because it often happens with little warning.

  • Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen.  It tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears and nose.  They may become pale, gray and blistered. At the same time, the child may complain that his/her skin burns or has become numb.
  • If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of her body in warm (not hot) water.  104° Fahrenheit (about the temperature of most hot tubs) is recommended. Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears and lips.
  • Victims may feel no more than a ‘pins and needles’ sensation in the hands and feet. Numbness can occur so quickly that the victim, unaware of being frostbitten, may remain outdoors, increasing his or her chances of permanent damage.
  • Do not rub the frozen areas. After a few minutes, dry and cover the child with clothing or blankets. Give him/her something warm to drink.
  •  If the numbness continues for more than a few minutes, call your doctor.

Winter health

  • Try using a cold air humidifier in the child’s room at night if your child suffers from winter nosebleeds. Saline nose drops or petrolatum may help keep nasal tissues moist. If bleeding is severe or recurrent, consult your pediatrician.
  •  Many pediatricians feel that bathing two or three times a week is enough for an infant’s first year. More frequent baths may dry out the skin, especially during the winter.
  •  Cold weather does not cause colds or flu.  But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other.  Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her elbow may help reduce the spread of colds and flu.
  • Children 6 months of age and up should get the influenza vaccine to reduce their risk of catching the flu.

Winter sports and activities

Action games, making snow angles and building snowmen will help to keep your child warm.

  • Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite.  Have children come inside periodically to warm up.
  •  Stay away from snowplows and snow blowers. Choose a play area away from roads, fences and water.

Sun protection

The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow.  Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen and consider using sun glasses.

Fire protection

Winter is a time when household fires occur. At the beginning of each winter season, get your chimney inspected and cleaned by a professional. Buildup in the chimney can cause a fire if it is not properly cleaned. It is a good time to remember to:

  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
  • Test smoke alarms monthly and practice fire drills with your children
  • Never use flammable liquids, evergreen trimmings, wrapping paper, cardboard, trash or debris.
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping

Cooking and kitchen safety

Cooking fires are the most common type of fires in U.S. households. By paying attention while cooking, you can prevent a kitchen fire.

  • If you are frying, grilling or broiling food, stay in the kitchen. Turn off the stove if you have to leave the kitchen, even if only for a short time.
  • Keep away from the stove top which are flammable. Wear close-fitting clothing that won’t drape over or touch burners while you are cooking.
  • If you are simmering, baking, roasting, boiling food, you don’t have to stay in the kitchen, but you do need to stay in the home. Check the food regularly and use a timer to remind you that you are cooking.
  • Turkey fryers pose significant fire hazards because they may produce delicious holiday dinners.

Portable heaters & space heaters

Place space heaters at least three feet away from anything that could catch fire, including paper, clothing and furniture. Make sure all heaters are in safe working condition.

Small children and pets should not be left alone with heaters. So make sure to turn off heaters when you leave the room or go to sleep.